Art Investment

“Art is not a thing, it is a way.

           – Elbert Hubbard

In today’s world the need for a diversified portfolio is ever increasing. This of course helps in reducing overall risk. At Crowns 3 we are the first to recognise that our clients are becoming more creative in their choice of investment.

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The global art market is growing, with the latest figures from The European fine art Foundation (TEFAF) suggesting it amounted to 46.1 billion Euros in 2011, taking into account public auctions and private sales.

This is an increase of two thirds, 63% since the market crisis in 2009, with China the driving force. Furthermore China has now overtaken the US for the first time in 2011 to become the largest art and antiques market worldwide.

Art can be so much more than only decoration for your house. It can be a investment, and help you diversify your portfolio. Some investors rank Art third only to property and Single Malt Scotch Whisky as the best place to put your money in.

Christies Evolution of Asian Art market – November 30 2012 CNN

For Christies – which had global auctions and private sales totalling $3.5 billion in the first half of 2012 – Asian market share is skyrocketing. Three years ago, Hong Kong accounted for only 3 % of global sales; last year, Hong Kong accounted for 20% of sales.

Trifles make perfection and perfection is not trifle.

~Michelangelo

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Having recognised the growing market and being ideally situated within south East Asia, Crowns 3 has the structural expertise to tailor make a portfolio strategy to suit their client’s investment goals.

Crowns 3 Art Investment specialist has extensive experience and connection ties with art auctions through out the U.S and Europe continent

The global art market is growing, with the latest figures from the European Fine Art Foundation (TEFAF) suggesting it amounted to €46.1bn in 2011, taking into account public auctions and estimated private sales.

This is an increase of nearly two thirds, 63pc, since the market crisis in 2009, TEFAF said, with China the driving force behind the recovery. China overtook the US for the first time in 2011 to become the largest art and antiques market worldwide.

Quote from the Telegraph, July 19th 2013

THE Dow Jones Industrial Average stock index climbed by an average of little more than 1% a year from 2001 to the end of 2012. Prices for artworks auctioned in New York during the same period rose by more than 5% a year, according to the Mei Moses All Art Index, which is based on resale values of paintings sold multiple times at auctions. Budding art investors face a problem, however: you often need deep pockets to buy an artwork. In an auction earlier this month at Sotheby’s in London, for example, 17 Russian canvas paintings sold for an average price of £389,205 ($600,000) each.

In theory, one answer is to divide ownership of artworks between investors just as shares divide claims on corporate profits. As well as making assets more affordable, exchanges should also make it easier to raise cash quickly from a collection or to divide its value evenly among heirs. Divvying up the ownership of an artwork turns it into “a liquid, tradable vehicle”, says Asher Edelman, head of ArtAssure, a New York lender that accepts art as collateral. In practice, experiments to date have not gone smoothly.

Quote from the Economist, 24th June 2013